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Femininity and Rationality. Saba Italia's Living

When women meet: Amelia Pegorin and Ludovica Serafini

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Femininity and Rationality. Saba Italia's Living
18/05/2017 - An all feminine brand: from the team working for it to the soft, welcoming collections they make, to the productive collaborations they established. All this in a man's world. We're talking about Saba Italia, an Italian women's entrepreneurship success story.

We asked Amelia Pegorin, the CEO of the brand to tell us the secret behind the successful story of her company. Easier said than done: Amelia explains that it's all about the balance between femininity and rationality. But it also depends on the fortunate encounter with people that speak your same language, as it happened with Ludovica Serafini of the Ludovica+Roberto Palomba Studio, who designed Saba's exhibition space at the Salone del Mobile. Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Indeed a fortunate encounter the one with Ludovica. She interpreted the brand's mood working on the 'dematerialization' concept. Space is dematerialized by big mirrors reflecting tents almost giving the impression to 'walk on a cloud.' One can see colored spots in these mirrors – the sofas – that the designer compares to big birds soaring in the sky.

Amelia summarizes Saba's evolution as a mix of 'sophisticated yet democratic elegance' and 'rational matter with an eye on lightness.' For Amelia, combining femininity and rationality means to create soft and welcoming sofas, in a word: feminine. But also more linear products – attributable to a man's idea – which still keep the womanly gesture that allow elements to shift.

The male principle wants projects to be precise and contemporary – Amelia explains – and it blends into the feminine idea of a light and simple gesture.
Saba isn't only an idea of elegance and aesthetics. It can also mix with other expressive forms that go beyond more rational areas but where there always is a fil rouge connecting lightness and possibilities. Women personify ranges of possibilities. We do not crystallize in a few forms. We have different ways to express ourselves. So is the living. Even Saba's most rational products have this shifting idea that belongs to femininity, I think.


And Ludovica's dematerialized stand perfectly embodies this concept of borderlessness.
Borders – Amelia continues – is polarizing the here and now making it everlasting. We are borderless instead. I believe in identity and personalization. And you can do business with these concepts. This dematerialization that I tried to pour in the sofas was implemented by Ludovica in the exhibition space creating an idea of dwelling. A bond which has exalted each product that had a perfect placement in the exhibition space: the tent – a 'mobile' concept of dwelling – is there and it is an ethereal object that defines an area. Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

And femininity is intuition most of all. Amelia answers this way to the question 'What inspires Saba's collection in forms and color?':

Our task is to observe and then to feel ourselves. Images feed us; colors pass us through as well as fashion. We need to let them deposit and then feel our instinct.

I love color. But I also love no color. I like to see mixture and dissonance and the colors that originate thereby. Other territories are neutral just because the product is attractive. The Quilt sofa, for example, with its exquisitely feminine quilting (a patchwork technique used by Western American women) recalls colors from the Far West with its burnt earthy colors and explosive greens. It couldn't be any different.
Color choice isn't exact science. It is made up of instinct and materials. It's the product that matches your instinct, and then it inflects itself autonomously. And I just support it.


Saba Italia on Archiproducts.comStand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

Stand Saba al Salone del Mobile © Saba italia

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