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Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

GAN presents a new collection designed by Belgian designer Charlotte Lancelot at iSaloni

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Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look
03/04/2015 - SILAÏ is the new collection from Belgian designer Charlotte Lancelot for GAN, GANDIABLASCO’s indoor brand. SILAI means “stitch” in the Indian language and represents a reinterpretation of petit point embroidery.
 
Inspired by the work of craftsmen Charlotte Lancelot has created a contemporary collection which aims to rediscover hand embroidered techniques, applying critical mass, use and context.

This is a technique that people know, that reminds them of times gone by and provokes nostalgia,” outlines the designer. SILAÏ celebrates the beauty of the age-old art of the handmade where the time, care and patience needed to make something is reflected. It is a “savoir-faire” that is being lost, because we have less and less time, we use objects which we consume quickly, that can be replaced easily.
 
Woven over a plastic grid, or a “framework”, the petit point are simple rapid diagonal stitching. The design of the carpets includes four types of distinct stitch that combined with each other in different ways create a beautiful harmony of colours and textures. The result: very light-weight carpets, comfortable and with a unique design.

The carpet becomes a reference point, it can be coordinated with elements: cushions, poufs and wooden side tables, that provide continuity and complement the interior of residential, public or commercial spaces.
 
The SILAÏ collection is available in four different colours, inspired by the variety of tiling patterns that were used traditionally to decorate floors. The small pouf included within the collection is light and easy to move around and can be used as an extra seat or as a foot stool.

On the other hand the combination of three low tables can become a larger centre table. Organised this way each element can be used together or separately thanks to their coordinated dimensions.
With its novel and inventive forms of embroidery used for carpets and furniture the SILAÏ collection creates contemporary environments that recall tried and tested techniques. Techniques that still use the same type of needle used since the beginning of mankind to produce practical and decorative stitches.
 
GAN at Salone del Mobile
Pav 20 - Booth B01/C06


GAN By Gandia Blasco on ARCHIPRODUCTSWool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

Wool woven on plastic lattice creates a hand-stitched look

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