Apparatus. Lighting, Furniture and Objects as Works of Art

Hand-finished sculptural pieces are assembled in a historic New York space

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Apparatus. Lighting, Furniture and Objects as Works of Art
07/06/2018 - Founded in 2012 by Gabriel Hendifar and Jeremy Anderson, Apparatus is a New York based design studio that explores the relationship of lighting, furniture and objects in immersive environments, threading the historical and the cultural through a modern lens.

Creative Director Gabriel Hendifar approaches the studio’s work as narrative, drawing on the vocabulary of desire and emotional response. Inspired by the modernist principle of a total work of art, the studio is an ever-evolving articulation of considered spaces and the things that live within them.

Sensual materials like marble, suede, horsehair, lacquer and porcelain are combined with patinated brass to create the studio’s distinctive catalog. Embracing a tradition of studio craftsmanship, each sculptural piece is hand-finished and assembled in a historic New York space that encompasses gallery, development and production. Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

ACT III collection, which has been launched in April 2018 during Salone del Mobile, stems from a Khatam box that Gabriel's grandmother brought with her from Iran to the United States when she relocated in 1979 as a political refugee. This collection is an attempt to find connection to that culture, and has simultaneously become a catalyst for confronting its familial, generational and political implications.

The objects in this collection evoke a pan-cultural aesthetic reminiscent of Bugatti, with elements made in Tehran, Italy and the United States. These include pieces using Khatam, a marquetry technique which originated in Shiraz, the birthplace of Gabriel’s grandmother; a dining table inspired by the Tombak, a drum that is foundational in Persian music and played by Gabriel’s father; a group of marble and leather tables that reference nomadic tray tables used across the Middle East to serve tea; a range of alabaster and fluted brass lighting that references Berber jewelry while pushing it through a futurist lens; a semi-precious stone sconce inspired by the details of statues at Persepolis. Apparatus, MEDIAN

Apparatus, MEDIAN

MEDIAN
The translucent alabaster planes of the Median Series are intersected by a fluted brass form, referencing traditional Middle Eastern jewelry while pushing it through a futurist lens. The stone glows from a light source that remains hidden, illuminating the relationship between the solid and the permeable. Apparatus, TALISMAN

Apparatus, TALISMAN

TALISMAN
A strict arrangement of semi-precious stones recalls fine details found on statues at the ancient city of Persepolis. Agate, Jasper, or Jade beads are pierced by finely fluted pins, affixing them to a leather-bound brass structure. Apparatus, DRUM

Apparatus, DRUM

DRUM
The Drum Series references the Tombak, a foundational instrument in Persian music, as a point of departure. Parchment is hand-stretched over the table surface, and the veneered legs curve to echo the shape of the suspended parchment volume. Apparatus, PARS

Apparatus, PARS

PARS
The delicate forms of the Pars Series evoke nomadic tray tables found across the Middle East. Hand-cut leather disks stack along brass legs, and inset leather rounds provide soft points of interaction in the stone table surfaces. Apparatus, SHIRAZ

Apparatus, SHIRAZ

SHIRAZ
The centuries old capital of Persian culture and a central hub on the Silk Road, the city of Shiraz has historically been the meeting point for an exchange of ideas between the Orient and the Occident. The Shiraz Series imagines objects of pan-cultural influence, blending a modernist interpretation of classical western forms with the intricate, geometric style of Persian marquetry called Khatam that originated in the city. Apparatus, SHIRAZ

Apparatus, SHIRAZ

The collection was to be offered in two variations - the first rendered in solid brass, punctuated by marble elements produced in Italy. The second iteration was planned as a limited edition produced in the Khatam tradition by artisans in Iran, using thousands of pieces of wood, metal, and camel bone to wrap forms in a kaleidoscopic pattern.

Unfortunately, due to current US sanctions against trade with Iran, which were recently expanded to include art objects, and having exhausted all possible avenues, Apparatus is prevented from producing the limited edition collection for the foreseeable future.Apparatus Milano, Gabriel Hendifar - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano, Gabriel Hendifar - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus Milano - Photo by Alex Lesage — threefold

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts

Apparatus New York © Archiproducts


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