Bodies in Motion: An Exploration in Human Movement

Humanscale presents an immersive installation designed by Todd Bracher and Studio TheGreenEyl at MDW

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Bodies in Motion: An Exploration in Human Movement
12/04/2019 - Humanscale returns to Milan Design Week 2019 with an immersive installation, Bodies in Motion. In a bold expression of sustainability, Humanscale presents a minimally built, interactive experience that explores the essence of human movement. Bodies in Motionis a visual metaphor of Humanscale’s commitment to human factors and designing for movement. The installation highlights their pioneering use of natural  use of natural ergonomics, which draws upon the laws of physics and motion to design products that automatically adapt to the user’s position.

Humanscale invited long-time design collaborator, Todd Bracher to create a multi-sensory experience at Salone del Mobile. With interest in exploring new modes of expressing human movement, Bracher tapped Studio TheGreenEyl, a design and research practice with a focus on digital design. The installation reinterprets the original scientific method of motion perception developed by Swedish psychophysicist, Gunnar Johansson in 1973, which involved placing lights on key points of the human body to highlight movement.

“When considering the experience, we looked to strip away cosmetic distractions and reveal human movement in its purest form. We wanted to extend this essential understanding of motion to fill the tunnel at Ventura Centrale in an experience that engages all visitors in the space,”says designer Todd Bracher. Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Using state-of-the art depth cameras, 15 moving light sources, and custom-designed software, visitors’ movements are translated into a moving light sculpture projected across the space. A subtle tribute to theVitruvian Manby Leonardo da Vinci on the 500-year anniversary of his death, the lights display an abstract human frame across a circular screen inviting visitors in upon entry. Bodies in Motions howcases Humanscale’s understanding of designing for diverse body types by capturing the universality of human movement, while simultaneously expressing the varied shapes, size, and proportions unique to each person.

“This year, we’ve shifted our perspective to showcase our core values andbrand ethos,”says Leena Jain, CMO of Humanscale.“Bodies in Motion gives visitors an experiential understanding of Humanscale’s commitment to supporting free and spontaneous movement, while showcasing our innovative approach to design and engineering in a sustainable way.” Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  ZanardiBodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David ZanardiBodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Visitors are encouraged to become a part of Bodies in Motion by projecting their own motions across the space. Between the interactive states, the installation creates abstract, generative light sculptures; three dimensional architectural forms that shift over time and continuously change.

Bodies in Motion is on display during Milan Design Week in the historical vaulted warehouses beneath the Milano Central Station as part of the third edition of Ventura Centrale.

Bodies in Motion 
Via Ferrante Aporti 29, 20125 Milan, ItalyBodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David  Zanardi

Bodies in Motion at MDW 2019 - Photo by David Zanardi

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